Emerging Technology

Curiosity: The Life-Long Learning Web Emerging Technology

12 Min Read Published by admin | January 9, 2020

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Native

Since then there have been quite a few apps to famously use React Native, and to great success (Artsy included). But there are an equal number of critical examples—perhaps most famously, Airbnb, who concluded that instead of the expected goal to write product code once instead of twice, “we wound up supporting code on three platforms instead of two.” This revelation is a telling one—not because React Native fails to live up to its promise, but because the false idea that React Native is “write once, run everywhere” is a dangerous one. And therein lies the risk of React Native as a suitable approach. If the app has its origins on the web to be built in React, that added cost might be worthwhile. But if the aim is primarily to develop a single application that can easily be managed across both mobile platforms, it likely isn’t—and any expense saved to consolidate some of the codebase will quickly be exceeded by the cost to maintain the added complexities.

    • App performance is mission-critical and the experience is tailored per platform
    • App uses hardware-level services or cutting-edge frameworks (such as ARKit or ARCore)
    • There is an inclination towards advancing technologies and toolchains offered by the platform providers nce is tailored per platform
    • or native ecosystems (such as watchOS/WearOS, or porting iOS to MacOS)
    • App uses hardware-level services or cutting-edge frameworks (such as ARKit or ARCore) performance is mission-critical and the experience is tailored per platform
    • There is an inclination towards advancing technologies and toolchains offered by the platform providers native ecosystems (such as watchOS/WearOS, or porting iOS to MacOS)

“THE MAIN SELLING POINT OF REACT NATIVE IS THAT IT LETS YOU USE REACT.”

CONCLUSION

But this also typically means staffing bespoke teams that specialize in each platform and the programming languages used to code for them. Even in cases where that expertise rests with a single team, it still means roughly 2x the workload and supporting 2x the codebase. And that’s where things can get particularly expensive, especially when it comes to maintaining each of those platforms long-term.

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